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Licensed Therapist to Join Tonight’s Journaling Session about Texas School Shooting

Ronella Ellis Ronella Ellis, a fellow mom and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT), will be joining our space tonight (Friday, May 27th at 7PM, EST.) to support us as we journal about Tuesday’s school shooting in Texas. She is a native of Connecticut and a fellow graduate of Hopkins School, where we met. She’s a very proud graduate of Spelman College and Nova Southeastern University. She is a multidisciplinary practitioner with nearly 20 years of experience She believes that mindfulness is a bridge that heals an unhealthy relationship with past and forges a healthy relationship with the future.I am so grateful that she has offered to support us tonight at 7-8:15PM on Zoom.…

Texas School Shooting: Journaling Space for Moms

Hi everyone, I’m really having a hard time wrapping my head around the recent school shooting in Uvalde, Texas, so tomorrow from 7-8:15pm, I’m hosting a virtual journaling space on Zoom for us moms to be together and write, talk and share. I’ve created this healing space, admittedly for myself, in hopes that some of you other moms will join me in taking a moment to begin to sort out all of the intense feelings inside of us, as an act of self-care. I feel helpless in this situation, and I’m hoping that if I can figure out which parts of the situation anger me most, then I can figure out what my role can be in making these shootings stop.…

I was quoted on the Senate floor!

My recent column, “Call Me Black, Not BIPOC” was quoted by Connecticut State Senator Marilyn Moore while she spoke in favor of #TheCrownAct, a bill that bans natural hair discrimination in the workplace. “‘She pointed to a recent New Haven Register op-ed by columnist Stacy Graham-Hunt, a journalist who is also the director of membership at the Arts Council of Greater New Haven,” Lucy Gellman of the Arts Paper reported. In the piece, Graham-Hunt argues that wide adoption of the term “BIPOC” (Black, Indigenous, People of Color), particularly among white institutions, has become the newest way of controlling the language and perception of Blackness through a white, Eurocentric lens.…

Home remedies for COVID-19

I watched a bunch of Queen Afua videos over the last week after watching her interviewing Lauren London about healing from grief. In this video, she talks with Angela Rya about transitioning to a holistic lifestyle, and she even tells you what to do if you’ve contacted Coronavirus. I really enjoyed their conversation.…

Why I Chose Toxic Men

I chose toxic men because I too was toxic. The Insider’s article, “Why intelligent and high-performing women fall for toxic partners,” got me thinking about my own relationships. I think I may have stayed in toxic relationships too long because I was also toxic. After breaking up with my first love in college, I fell for the next guy simply because he made me forget about the first. I would hate for someone to tell me that they love me because I make them forget about someone else, but it happens. I’ve used guys as rebounds, and I’m certain that I have been a rebound before…because karma.…

Not content to live with tokenism

Tokenism is being the one black student in a classroom full of white students. It’s being the only Hispanic employee in a predominantly white organization, and it’s when that historically white school or organization says it’s diverse because of that one black or Hispanic student or employee. For me, it’s meant being one of two black students in my class at my Connecticut private elementary school, St. Thomas’s Day School. It’s meant being the only black person in most of my classes at Hopkins School, ranked as one of the top private middle and high schools in the country. I never understood why these private schools in New Haven didn’t have more black students when the city’s black population has been at least 30 percent for decades.…

First Taste of Racism Arrived in 6th Grade

I’ll never forget the first time I experienced blatant racism. It was from a parent at West Woods School. This is the same Hamden school that recently made international news after one of its teachers cast a 10-year-old black student as a slave in a play about colonialism. After living in New Haven and attending private school for three years, my family moved to Hamden, and I was enrolled in West Woods as a fifth-grader. I was also 10 years old. Despite being one of very few black students in my class, I loved it there. I had many friends. We celebrated birthdays together, spent time together outside of the classroom, and often had funny conversations about my crush and classmate, “Ralph.”…

Learning about Pride all Month Long

Photo: Middletown Press By Stacy Graham-Hunt I love to take my son on a new adventure on Saturdays. Two Saturdays ago, I decided to take him to Kid City, a children’s museum in Middletown. Little did I know that the city would be celebrating its lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender queer/questioning, or LGBT, community that same day. I drove for about 40 minutes on a bright, sunny and clear day, uninterrupted by traffic, while my 21-month-old son slept peacefully in his car seat in the backseat. When we were only 5 minutes away from the museum, the main roads were blocked off with police barricades and a few costumed men and women seemed to be waiting in anticipation of something along the sidewalks.…

Thankful for the Right to Choose a Hard Choice

Getty Images I had an abortion when I was 19 years old. It was the summer after my sophomore year in college. My boyfriend at the time and I were having unprotected sex. I got pregnant. That was 16 years ago. It’s scary to think of what my life would have been like if I was a pregnant teenager living in Alabama now, and was not able to terminate my pregnancy. Earlier this month, Alabama’s governor signed the “Human Life Protection Act,” banning all abortions in the state, except when “abortion is necessary in order to prevent a serious health risk” to the woman.…